Agenda and draft minutes

Council - Wednesday 27 January 2021 6.00 pm

Venue: Virtual Meeting

Contact: Caroline McCleary  Democratic Services Officer

Media

Items
No. Item

52.

Opening Prayers.

Minutes:

The Mayor’s Chaplin, Reverend Sally Baylis delivered opening prayers.

 

The Mayor lit a candle in recognition of Holocaust Memorial Day and the Council observed a minute’s silence. The Mayor also wished to remember the 100,000 people who had lost their lives to Covid-19 since the start of the pandemic.

53.

Apologies for Absence.

Minutes:

None.

54.

Mayor's Announcements.

Minutes:

The Mayor thanked Arnold and Mapperley Rotary Club for inviting her to their annual meeting and for their generous offer of a donation to the Mayor’s charity. The Mayor, on behalf of the Council, also wished to thank all of the Nottinghamshire hospitals and NHS staff for their hard work and dedication throughout the Covid-19 pandemic and the staff and volunteers at the Richard Herrod Centre for their efforts in efficiently rolling out the vaccination programme.

55.

To approve, as a correct record, the minutes of the meeting held on 18 November 2020. pdf icon PDF 121 KB

Minutes:

RESOLVED:

 

That the minutes of the above meeting, having been circulated, be approved as a correct record.

 

56.

Declaration of Interests.

Minutes:

None received.

57.

To deal with any petitions received under Standing Order 8a.

Minutes:

None received.

58.

To answer questions asked by the public under Standing Order 8.

Minutes:

None received.

59.

To answer questions asked by Members of the Council under Standing Order 9.

Question from Councillor Sam Smith to the Portfolio Holder for Public Protection:

 

“We have all seen an increase in anti-social behaviour in our Wards over the past year. Can the Cabinet Member responsible inform us of how this data is collected by the Council and what plans the Council has in place to reduce anti-social behaviour across the Borough?”

Minutes:

Question received from Councillor Sam Smith

 

“We have all seen an increase in anti-social behaviour in our Wards over the past year. Can the Cabinet Member responsible inform us of how this data is collected by the Council and what plans the Council has in place to reduce anti-social behaviour across the Borough?”

 

Response from the Portfolio Holder for Public Protection, Councillor David Ellis

 

“I suppose I ought to start with an apology to those members who are on Overview and Scrutiny. I alerted members on the Committee to this increase in reports of anti-social behaviour (ASB) when I attended it in November.  As well as that discussion, the Committee considered an update earlier this month.  These two meetings gave the opportunity for a thorough discussion on ASB and the effect of Covid 19. 

 

Therefore, much of this reply will be familiar to members on Overview and Scrutiny. Councillor Smith was at both those meetings so I’m not sure what additional insights he expects to gain from asking this question that he could not have gained from taking advantage of the earlier opportunities.

 

Recorded incidents of anti-social behaviour reported by the Council are taken from two data sets. The primary data is incidents reported to Nottinghamshire Police.  The second is incidents reported to the Council and recorded on its own system, Uniform.

 

As I discussed with members at the Scrutiny Committee, the increase in reported ASB since March 2020 is mainly driven by reports of infringements of Covid restrictions.  In line with the police national recording standards these are recorded as ASB.  Consequently, there has been an apparent increase - locally, across the South Notts CSP area, across Nottinghamshire, and indeed nationally.  Much of this was exacerbated during the first period of lockdown which coincided with good weather, that proved too much temptation for many.

 

The latest information from the Police and Crime Commissioner and the Chief Constable confirms that the increase in ASB is primarily due to the enforcement of Covid restrictions and that the underlying level of “traditional” ASB has not increased.  It’s anticipated that the significant increase in reported ASB seen at the six month point will have diminished when the full year figures are published.

 

The response to ASB is a partnership effort.  The Council works closely with the neighbourhood policing team, as well as other partners such as social housing providers, to provide an effective and comprehensive response. The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 consolidated the powers available to deal with ASB.  These powers include civil injunctions; criminal behaviour orders and community protection notices, all of which are taken against individuals.  Action can be taken where the problems relate to specific places through Public Space Protection Orders, Dispersal Orders, and Closure orders. As you would expect the Council and its partners use their powers appropriately and judiciously.  Under this Administration the Council has consistently demonstrated its determination to take action where necessary.

 

Responding to Covid has been a challenge to all public services.  ...  view the full minutes text for item 59.

60.

Council Tax Reduction Scheme pdf icon PDF 275 KB

Report of the Director of Corporate Resources

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Director of Corporate Resources and S151 Officer, seeking approval for the continuation of the Council Tax Reduction Scheme (CTRS) for the financial year 2021/22.

 

RESOLVED to:

 

Approve and adopt the Council Tax Reduction Scheme (CTRS) 2021/22, from 1 April 2021 with no changes to the CTRS for working age people as described in Section 2 of this report, except for the annual uprating and amendments of allowances and premiums in line with Housing Benefit levels.

61.

Referral from Appointments and Conditions of Service Committee: Pay Policy Statement 2021-22 pdf icon PDF 611 KB

Report of the Service Manager Organisational Development.

 

Council is recommended to:

 

Adopt the pay policy statement for publication on the Council’s website.

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Service Manager Organisational Development, which had been referred to Council by the Appointments and Conditions of Service Committee.

 

RESOLVED to:

 

Adopt the Pay Policy Statement 2021/22 for publication on the Council’s website.

62.

Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report pdf icon PDF 15 KB

Report of the Democratic Services Officer.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Democratic Services Officer, which had been referred to Council by the Overview and Scrutiny Committee.

 

RESOLVED:

 

That the Overview and Scrutiny Annual report be noted by Council.

 

 

63.

Independent Remuneration Panel - Report and recommendations for 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 266 KB

Report of the Democratic Services Manager.

Minutes:

Consideration was given to a report of the Democratic Services Manager, informing Council of the latest report from the Independent Remuneration Panel (IRP), relating to member remuneration for 2021/22.

 

RESOLVED to:

 

1)    Thank the Independent Remuneration Panel for its work;

 

2)    Accept the recommendations of the Independent Remuneration Panel contained in the report;

 

3)    Agree the schedule of members’ allowances for 2021/22 as attached at Appendix 2 to this report; and

 

4)    Authorise the Monitoring Officer to make appropriate amendments to Part 6 of the Constitution to reflect any changes to the members’ allowances scheme agreed.

 

64.

To receive questions and comments from Members concerning any matter dealt with by the Executive or by a Committee or Sub-Committee (Standing Order 11.1). pdf icon PDF 140 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

In accordance with Standing Order 11.1, comments were made and responded to by the appropriate Cabinet Member or Committee Chair.

65.

To consider comments, of which due notice has been given, under Standing Order 11.03(a).

Minutes:

None received.

66.

To consider motions under Standing Order 12.

Motion One

 

Fireworks are used by people throughout the year to mark different events. While they can bring much enjoyment to some people, they can cause significant problems and fear for other people and animals. They can be a source of fear and distress for many animals (including pet animals, farm livestock and wildlife). Animals affected not only suffer psychological distress but can also cause themselves injuries – sometimes very serious ones – as they attempt to run away or hide from the noise.

 

This Council therefore resolves to:

 

1)    Require all public firework displays within the local authority boundaries to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people.

 

2)    Actively promote a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people – including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks.

 

3)    Write to the UK Government and Gedling Borough’s two local Members of Parliament urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays and to support the RSPCA in their campaign to ensure the safety of all animals.

 

4)    Encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock ‘quieter’ fireworks for public display.

 

5)    Write to the Leader and Chief Executive of Nottinghamshire County Council inviting and encouraging them to also take the action outlined in points 1 – 4 above.

 

6)    Work with Nottinghamshire County Council and all other relevant authorities to ensure existing legislation regarding purchase of and setting off fireworks is enforced across our borough and county.

 

Proposed: Cllr Rachael Ellis

Seconded: Cllr Des Gibbons

 

Motion Two

 

This Council notes:

 

Bees and other pollinators play an essential role in the Earth's ecosystems. Bees and other pollinators are vital to our food crops, our gardens and our countryside, but they are declining – some species have become extinct, others are declining in range. Bees not only maintain biodiversity but also pollinate plants which produce food. The Government has estimated that these pollinators are worth around £500 million to the UK food and fruit industries alone; bees therefore help keep healthy habitats for people and nature.

 

This pollinator decline is due to various external influences. These causes include disease, climate change, loss of habitat and the use of insecticides such as neonicotinoids (‘neonics’). Neonicotinoid use has been linked in a range of studies to adverse ecological effects, including honeybee colony collapse disorder.

 

The World Health Organisation’s cancer agency has recently declared that herbicides that include glyphosate are probably carcinogenic to humans. Glysophate lab trials have shown impact on bee behaviours, although not on their foraging efficiency.

 

Local authorities already have a Duty to have regard to the conservation of biodiversity in exercising their functions, introduced by the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act, which came into force on 1 October 2006. The Duty affects all public authorities and aims to raise the profile and visibility of  ...  view the full agenda text for item 66.

Minutes:

Motion One

 

Upon a notice of motion received in the name of Councillor Rachael Ellis, a proposition was moved by Councillor Rachael Ellis and seconded by Councillor Gibbons in the following terms:

 

This Council notes:

 

Fireworks are used by people throughout the year to mark different events. While they can bring much enjoyment to some people, they can cause significant problems and fear for other people and animals. They can be a source of fear and distress for many animals (including pet animals, farm livestock and wildlife). Animals affected not only suffer psychological distress but can also cause themselves injuries - sometimes very serious ones – as they attempt to run away or hide from the noise.

 

This Council therefore resolves to:

 

1)    Require all public firework displays within the local authority boundaries to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people.

 

2)    Actively promote a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people – including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks.

 

3)    Write to the UK Government and Gedling Borough’s two local Members of Parliament urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays and to support the RSPCA in their campaign to ensure the safety of all animals.

 

4)    Encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock ‘quieter’ fireworks for public display.

 

5)    Write to the Leader and Chief Executive of Nottinghamshire County Council inviting and encouraging them to also take the action outlined in points 1 – 4 above.

 

6)    Work with Nottinghamshire County Council and all other relevant authorities to ensure existing legislation regarding purchase of and setting off fireworks is enforced across our borough and county.

 

RESOLVED UNANIMOUSLY to:

 

1)    Require all public firework displays on Gedling Borough Council owned land, and advise and encourage organisers of other public firework displays within Gedling borough, to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people.

 

2)    Actively promote a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people – including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks.

 

3)    Write to the UK Government and Gedling Borough’s two local Members of Parliament urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays and to support the RSPCA in their campaign to ensure the safety of all animals.

 

4)    Encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock ‘quieter’ fireworks for public display.

 

5)    Write to the Leader and Chief Executive of Nottinghamshire County Council inviting and encouraging them to also take the action outlined in points 1 – 4 above.

 

6)    Work with Nottinghamshire County Council and all other relevant authorities to ensure existing legislation regarding purchase of and setting off fireworks is enforced  ...  view the full minutes text for item 66.